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Best Wide Neck Electric Guitar For Fat Fingers in 2022

Ah, the old fat fingers issue. Yes, it happens to the best of us. Not all guitarists have the long supple fingers of Jimi Hendrix.

Players with chunky hands may find some styles of guitar too small for them. Playing a guitar that’s too small for you will inhibit playing technique, it may even put you off playing altogether.

Even if it’s the best electric guitar ever, if it’s too small, it won’t feel great to play.

It’s important to use the right size guitar for improving muscle memory and coordination.

Wide neck guitars are the best choice for players with fat fingers. 

Wide neck guitars are especially good for players with big fingers, which can get in the way of playing chords on a standard guitar neck.

I tested 9 guitars and found the best wide neck electric guitar for fat fingers is the Fender Player Stratocaster.

Fender Player Stratocaster | Wide Neck Electric Guitar For Fat Fingers

This is the most popular and widely used guitar among beginner to intermediate players. It has a comfortable neck that accommodates fat fingers and its body size is right for most players.

The Fender Player Stratocaster is an incredibly well-made guitar, that will last you for the rest of your life.

The Ibanez AS73 Artcore was also a great choice, check out our Ibanez AS73 Artcore Review!

The Gibson Les Paul Standard, The Fender Player Stratocaster, The Ibanez RG321MH, and the Gretsch Streamliner are examples of excellent electric guitars for people with bigger fingers. 

They have wider frets that will make it easier for you to play chords and solos on the guitar.

This also means that they will be easier to travel with as well, which is great for musicians who are always on the go. 

The Fender Player Stratocaster is a fantastic, pro-quality guitar, with a large enough nut width to accommodate big-handed players.

Nut Width:

Guitar players with large hands or fat fingers should look at the nut width of a guitar before buying. The nut width measurement accurately describes how wide the neck is. Guitar players with big hands should avoid a thin neck.

Here are the average nut width measurements for each company:

CompanyWidth ( in Inch )
Gibson: 1.695”
Ibanez: 1.692”
PRS: 1.687”
Fender: 1.66”


This shows that Gibson, Ibanez, and PRS guitars favor wide neck designs. 

Keep reading for our full lineup of the best Wide Neck Electric guitars for Fat fingers.

This article is only looking at electric guitars. Some acoustic guitars are also great for large hands. Classical guitar models are also a viable option. If you’re looking for an acoustic guitar for players with big hands, check out our other guides.

Best Wide Neck Electric Guitar for Fat Fingers in Our Tests

  1. Fender Player Stratocaster
  2. Ibanez GAX30
  3. Epiphone Les Paul Special
  4. PRS SE Custom 24
  5. Gretsch Streamliner
  6. Epiphone SG Special wide neck guitar
  7. Ibanez RGA42FM
  8. Ibanez Artcore AS73
  9. Squire Classic Vibe Jazzmaster

9 Best Wide Neck Electric Guitar for Fat Fingers Reviewed in Detail

1. Fender Player Stratocaster

Fender Player Stratocaster

Hey player! Got big hands? The Fender Player Strat is the wide-neck guitar for you. Its huge comfortable neck and no-nonsense controls make playing guitar a dream.

The Fender Player Strat is the axe of choice for today’s modern guitarist. With a unique blend of traditional features and contemporary refinements, it will meet the needs of any musician. With its comfortable body design, easy-playing neck, and varied tone-shaping controls, the Player Stratocaster is the perfect instrument for any playing style.

This is a serious guitar for serious guitarists, thick fingers or not. Stratocasters are great guitars for any guitarist. Their design has been in use for over 70 years, with no sign of becoming irrelevant. 

It has an incredibly versatile tone, making it easy to find the sound you are looking for. Not many guitars are as flexible as this. Its versatility comes from its 3 pickups and flexible electronics. With two tone knobs and one volume, there is a decent amount of independence when it comes to sculpting the pickup tone.

The wide maple fretboard is brilliantly smooth and accommodates larger hands.  The maple neck and maple body make this versatile guitar sound resonant and full.

It has decent string spacing which stops even short fat fingers from getting tangled. Having slightly more space than other Fender models gives this an advantage.

The sound quality is superb. We particularly liked the neck and bridge pickups, but the middle one also had a fantastic quality. We chose this as our best wide neck guitar because these are reliable instruments.

A Fender Stratocaster is the benchmark in professional guitar quality. There are many ranges of Fender Stratocaster, from the player series to vintage, American performer, or more. Other Fender models are also great for big-handed players. Their Jazzmasters have a large scale length, as do their baritone guitars.

This is also relatively light, check out our best lightweight guitars post for similar instruments.

Pros

  • Fender build & sound quality
  • Top class pickups
  • Super flexible sound
  • Wide neck

Cons

  • Maple fretboard is not for everybody

Check the Price on Amazon

2. Ibanez GAX30

Ibanez GAX30

The Ibanez Gax30 is a great wide-neck guitar for any beginner or intermediate player. Ibanez Guitars is a company that has always been about making the best. 

This kit comes with everything you need to get started and is perfect for beginners. 

With its sleek appearance, high output Infinity R pickups, and wide string spacing, any musician or music lover with chubby fingers would be proud to own one. 

The Ibanez Gax30 guitar is the perfect electric guitar for players with thick fingers, thanks to its wide thin neck shape and large string spacing. Its C shape neck has a glossy finish which makes it easy to play with.

The Gax30 guitar is lightweight, has a natural wood look with a wild cherry body., and comes with high-quality steel strings that won’t break for a while.

This guitar sounds great and looks just as good. It has a simple electronic design with a single volume and tone knob, and a bridge, and a neck pickup. It has a rich sound with a decent tone.

This could be the best guitar in the budget category. The neck pickup was a little thin compared to most but was warm enough.

They don’t compete so well with the more expensive instruments like Fenders, PRS, or Gibson, but they are great value for money. 

These make great beginner guitars. We particularly liked the percussive tone achieved by muting strings.

You will be impressed by the quality given at that price.

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Two warm Humbuckers

Cons

  • Smooth Neck
  • No tremolo
  • Mediocre Bridge

Check the Price on Amazon

3. Epiphone Les Paul Special

Epiphone Les Paul Special

If you love the sound of vintage guitars but hate the weight and cost, you’re in luck! 

Modeled on the famous Gibson Les Paul model, these wide neck electric guitars cost 1/10th of the price.

The Epiphone Les Paul is a lightweight, powerful wide neck guitar that has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. 

The neck width makes it easy for players with a fat finger to hold a bar chord. The rosewood fretboard didn’t have any buzz which is good for guitars in this price range.

Its 650R and 700T Humbucker pickups give it an authentic vintage rocker sound. You’ll never miss out on that classic tone. Its humbuckers took well to saturation and distortion, with an up-front, transient attack and long growling sustain.

The fretboard is wider than the average guitar, accommodating larger-handed players. It has more space than the average guitar.

This Epiphone LP electric guitar is a high-quality instrument that can bring out the best in your playing. The Epiphone Les Paul custom is a similar model of guitar that could be great for wide hands and is one of the best guitars for beginners too.

 With a wide neck for fat fingers, and great sound and playability, this is the one you’ve been looking for. It’s a dream come true.

Pros

  • Long, wide neck
  • Fat Humbucker Pickups
  • Decent tuning

Cons

  • Slightly hissy pickups

Check the Price on Amazon

4. PRS SE Custom 24 Electric Guitar

PRS SE Custom 24 Electric Guitar

Whether you’re a seasoned musician or just starting out, the PRS SE Custom 24 guitar was made for you. Crafted with precision and care, this beautiful instrument is the perfect choice for any player. Check out its clear tone and versatile design to get the best playing experience possible.

The PRS SE Custom 24 guitar is a professional instrument for the big-handed player. It’s made from maple and mahogany, has a sleek sound, and has the signature PRS tremolo, headstock, and neck.

The 24 frets are deep and wide, which accommodates larger hands with ease. The double-cutaway also gives full fretboard access. It’s got the PRS sustain and clarity that you need to make your music come alive. With its solid mahogany body, no distracting electronics, and classy looks, it’s perfect for the job. Whether you’re recording or just jamming in your living room, this guitar is a great fit.

The 1.68” nut width ensures a comfortable playing experience for large hands, paired with its PRS signature neck shape.

The sound is as beautiful as it looks, which is stunning. This guitar features PRS80 and 15 pickups. The coil tapping feature allows the humbuckers to be split into their individual single coils. 

This is a futuristic feature that brings a huge amount of sonic possibility. This is essentially a single-coil and a humbucker guitar in one!

This guitar plays very well with excellent dynamic range and frets response. If you play guitar passionately, this meets your level of interest and deep love for the guitar.

I love PRS guitars and I’m sure most players would too! I think these could be the best guitar for metal players with big hands.

The SE Custom 24 is the perfect guitar for the player who wants PRS quality and performance but doesn’t want to spend a fortune. This vintage-inspired instrument is at home in any style of music, from classic rock to country. If you’ve been looking for the best SE guitar on the market, your search ends here.

Pros

  • Incredibly slick look and feel
  • Stellar sound quality
  • Amazing neck

Check the Price on Amazon

5. Gretsch Streamliner

Gretsch Streamliner

The Gretsch Streamliner embodies everything great about vintage Gretsch guitars. Inspired by the original design and updated to create a truly modern instrument, the Streamliner is a stunning guitar with a thin “U” profile neck shape, anchored Adjusto-Matic bridge, and Bigsby B70 vibrato tailpiece.

Gretsch Streamliner is one of the best guitars for those with big hands or wide fingers. Lightweight and easy to use, don’t pass up on this hollow body guitar. The fretboard felt very wide and expansive, making it easy to grip the strings and hold chords.

These gorgeous guitars have Gretsch’s iconic Broad’Tron Pickups with a bright, twangy tone with crunchy mids. This is great for rock, blues, and jazz players. They almost sound like acoustic guitars when used with a bright tone.

Gretsch Streamliner 2021

These certainly have an eye-catching look. When I went to the guitar shop, these were the ones that pulled me in the most. 

There’s something about the shiny Bigsby bridge and unusual metallic pickups that give it a very desirable look. These suit older styles of music better than contemporary genres.

This is a hollow body guitar, so it’s not going to work amazingly well for metal or high-gain music. It has the same issues as an acoustic guitar. The hollow body would be prone to feedback in loud amplified situations.

Pros

  • Bigsby bridge is great for pitch bends
  • Retro pickups

Cons

  • Prone to feedback

Check the Price on Amazon

6. Epiphone SG Special

Epiphone SG Special

This Epiphone SG Special has a classic 1960’s SG look, sound, and feel. 

This guitar has a poplar body and mahogany veneer with a vintage worn finish. The bolt-on mahogany neck features a 1960’s slim taper D profile with medium jumbo frets for big hands. 

With these features and its Humbucking pickups with ceramic magnets, this guitar will resonate with you for many years to come. The mahogany body veneer provides a warm mid-range sustain. 

It features a 650R in the bridge position, and a hotter 700T as a bridge pick up. It has the traditional master volume and master tone control with a 3-way selector. The pickups responded well to distorted amps with a firm growl. 

The bridge circuit has a brighter, harsher sound, which suits high-gain guitar solo tones. The neck pickup is a bit darker and warmer. Both pickups can be combined with the selector switch to create a hybrid tone. 

These have a classic rock tone, made popular by bands in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Equally at home as lead guitar or in the rhythm position. These are similar to Les Paul models, but more suited to heavier music. Les Pauls compare at quality and price, the main difference being the body design and the style of pickups. 

They are fairly different-sounding guitars. If you have more classic tastes over heavy, then a Les Paul might be better than an SG.

Its LockTone and Tune-o-Matic bridge and die-cast machine heads had an accurate and lasting tuning. The tuning pegs were smooth to turn and didn’t have any resistance.

This is one of the more affordable guitars, but it still had a brilliant construction and sound quality. These are great for big-handed players thanks to the double-cutaway and comfortable fretboard. If you are looking for a more affordable version of the iconic Gibson SG, then this is a great bet.

Pros

  • Crunchy Humbuckers
  • Great action & feel

Cons

  • Unusually light

Check the Price on Amazon

7. Ibanez RGA42FM

Ibanez RGA42FM

Crank up the volume and rock the house on your next gig with this metal shredding guitar.

This beauty has 24 frets for extended solos and high output humbuckers that will make even the most stubborn of eardrums rejoice. 

The Meranti body and wizard III maple neck ensure a pleasant experience for you and your listeners. This guitar is perfect for beginners looking to experiment with different styles of playing, and experienced professionals alike.

The Ibanez RGA42FM brings the world of shreds to chubby fingertips!

Play heavy metal guitar with the Ibanez RGA42FM. This axe has a deep cutaway and is one of the fastest necks you’ll ever play.  The deep cutaway makes shredding and left-hand finger tapping a breeze. For practice and performance, these make the grade.

The high output pickups make this a perfect guitar for distorted tones. This guitar is crying out to be plugged into a bunch of distortion pedals and a scorching amplifier. 

They retain a low-end punch but have a bright cutting tone with a rich high end. The pickups can be switched between with a 3-way selector switch.

There is only one tone and volume knob, so the pickups can’t be sculpted individually.

Like many Ibanez guitars, this features 24 frets, which is larger than most. This gives lead guitar players some extra notes to play with for their face-melting solos. These extra frets make a big difference and make this guitar well suited for metal and heavy music. 

The neck is also one of the widest on this list, there’s plenty of room for big fingers. Get shredded with an Ibanez.

Pros

  • Heavy metal beast
  • 24 frets & deep cutaway- great for shredding
  • High output pickups

Cons

  • Occasional fret buzz
  • No tremolo

Check the Price on Amazon

8. Ibanez Artcore AS73

Ibanez Artcore AS73

This guitar features a double-cutaway body with an all-maple design. Featuring a 22-fret rosewood fretboard. This guitar is outfitted with the ART1 bridge and ACH humbuckers, for a full range of sound.

The Ibanez Artcore is a beautiful guitar, pure and simple. With its lush tone and excellent sustain, the Artcore is perfect for jazz, blues, folk, and country music. Paired with its sleek design and beautiful finish options, the guitar has a great look that will last a long time.

We thought this was on the thinner side for wide necks, but still adequate for larger hands, feeling close to an acoustic guitar thanks to its hollow body.

 This is similar to the Gretsch Streamliner, but with a simpler bridge (no Bigsby). They are similar in tone but the Gretsch is slightly more interesting. I think this is reflected in the lower price, which will be more affordable for intermediate guitarists.

It sounded sweet plugged into a retro blues amplifier like a Fender Twin Reverb. Using an old tube amp captures the authentic tone of guitars from the era of this style. 

Hollowbody and archtop guitars are the ancestors of the modern styles of today. This kind of guitar even predates the Stratocaster by about 30 years.

This guitar has separate tone and volume knobs for each pickup, which gives more room for tone sculpting. The bridge pickup is bright, thin, and twangy. The neck pickup is warmer and more rounded, less cutting. 

The control knobs and selector switch give a broad array of possibilities when it comes to combining and filtering the pickups.

The Ibanez Artcore Hollowbody offers all the luxuries of a high-end guitar without the high-end price tag.

 Want to experience the perfect blend of form and function? Get your hands on an Artcore today!

Pros

  • Rich resonant tone
  • Versatile sound
  • Light body

Cons

  • The hollow body is prone to feedback
Check the Price on Amazon

9. Squire Classic Vibe Jazzmaster

Squire Classic Vibe Jazzmaster

This is an affordable version of the iconic Fender Jazzmaster. These guitars are known to be ideal for big-handed players because of their larger necks. The Jazzmaster uses a bigger nut width and longer neck to create a larger, more comfortable fretboard. 

Jazzmasters are one of my favorite guitars, maybe because my hands are on the fatter side. Maybe because they have such a killer tone. 

The Jazzmaster uses soap bar single-coil pickups with an interesting split-tone circuit. This guitar features Fender-designed Alnico pickups for that iconic, vintage tone.

These are ideal for playing surf rock, blues, jazz, and shoegaze music. 

Squire Jazzmaster is 100% designed by Fender, based on 1960s-era Jazzmaster models. The gloss neck finish and nickel-plated hardware make Squire Jazzmaster a true Fender original in looks, sound, and feel.

The Squire Jazzmaster model features a vintage-tinted gloss neck finish, 8″ fingerboard radius, rosewood fingerboard with Pearloid dot position inlays, modern “F” logo, and matching headstock logo.

These sound pretty decent for the price. They don’t compare with Fender models, but nor does the cost. We had some issues with the bridge, where the strings would pop out of the grooves. The bridge-style could easily be replaced though. The vibrato arm was a nice authentic addition and doesn’t skew the tuning too much.

Pros

  • Retro vibe guitar
  • Big Fretboard and frets
  • Cool Sound

Cons

  • Low-Quality bridge
Check the Price on Amazon

Are Wide Neck Guitars Easier to Play?

Depending on your hand size, a wide neck electric guitar can be easier to play. 

Wide neck guitars are made for the player who needs a little more room to comfortably stretch their fingers. 

The wide neck is easier on your hands and can make playing the guitar feel more natural and fluid. 

Wider necks result in wider string spacing. This makes it easier to fret chord positions without your chunky fingers overlapping onto other strings. 

The wider neck provides a lot more comfort for the player and frees up space for their fingers to move freely.

Although, players with smaller hands may find wider necks harder to play. They may not be able to reach across the entire fretboard to finger chords properly.

Wider necks will be easier to use if you have big fingers. It will be easier for both soloing and chords.

Is an acoustic guitar good for wide hands?

Some acoustic guitars are great for wide hands. Classical guitars can be a good choice because their nylon strings are supple and fretted easily. Check out our top fingerstyle acoustic guitar round-up, which includes several wide-neck acoustics.

If you asked, is acoustic guitar better than electric guitar for wide hands? I’d say, there isn’t a better one, either way, it ultimately depends on the dimensions and design of each individual model. Some acoustic guitars are better than electrics and vice versa.

The key is finding a guitar with the right dimensions, so it feels natural in your hands.

Factors to Look for When Choosing Best Wide Neck Electric Guitar for Fat Fingers

The wider neck provides a lot more comfort for the player and frees up space for their fingers to move freely.

There are many factors to consider when considering a guitar- but one, in particular, should be considered before anything else: the width of the neck.

You must choose a guitar with the appropriate neck width for your hand size and playing style, as this will have a significant effect on your performance. 

Most guitars have necks that are not wide enough for people with fat fingers or players who have large fingers, which can make playing difficult. So it is important to find a guitar with a wide neck so that you can play comfortably and freely without feeling constricted by your instrument.

The electric guitar is one of the most iconic instruments in the world. With a range of prices, tones, and body styles to choose from you’ll find that there are plenty of options available.

You should ask these questions before setting out on a guitar purchase mission.

  • What is your budget?
  • What do you plan on using the guitar for?
  • Do you want an acoustic-electric or just a stand-alone electric guitar?
  • Do you prefer an old-school Fender Stratocaster or a Gibson Les Paul?
  • Or maybe something more contemporary like an Ibanez?
  • How important is sound quality to you (effects, amp)?

Nut width and Scale Length

We covered nut width earlier. Scale length is another commonly given guitar specification that measures the length of the fretboard. Guitar players with larger hands may find it advantageous to avoid short-scale guitars. A shorter scale results in smaller, more horizontally condensed frets, where large-handed players may struggle to fit all their fingers. Aim to use a guitar with a scale length above 24”.

The neck shape is also an important factor. There are many different neck profiles, from C, D to U, and many more. Generally large handed players favor a U or D neck instead of a C. Although it often comes down to preference rather than science. Try different neck profiles and choose one that feels most comfortable.

Fakes

When buying second-hand guitars, ask for verification that it’s an original model. Many high-value guitars are copied and forged in imitation factories.

Unfortunately, eBay and second-hand stores are prone to letting these fakes slip through the net. Before buying a guitar, check it for any manufacturer’s codes, and compare on their website. 

Most guitar websites have some kind of verification system where you can check the serial numbers of a guitar to find if it comes from a real batch. 

Conclusion

Overall, our favorite electric guitar for big hands was the Fender Player Stratocaster.

The Player Stratocaster is the answer to all your prayers — a guitar that’s perfect for fat fingers! 

You’ll find this guitar is very versatile sounding and has a nice width on the nut for those big hands. Professionally built with a quality that’s second to none, this instrument will keep you happy all around. 

It is really easy to play, even if you have fat fingers, and the strings are so easy to fret. The tone is so smooth and you’ll be able to get some fantastic sustain from it. This guitar will look great in all of the finishes it comes in.

Stratocasters are an all-around great guitar. There are many ranges of Fender Stratocaster, we settled on the player range for its affordability, quality, and slightly larger sizes.

These have a versatile sound that works with many styles of music. The craftsmanship of Fender guitars is so high that when you pick one up, you won’t want to put it down.

Check out this guitar today!